What is the difference between CMYK and RGB?

What is the difference between CMYK and RGB?
What is the difference between CMYK and RGB?

RGB colors are primary colors in additive color mixing. Additive colors are mixed with light and are used in television monitors or digital cameras, for example. If you mix all RGB colors together, you get white. This is why color mixing is called "additive." Colors are added. For printing, however, the data should be in CMYK, as it is well known that light cannot be physically mixed. The CMYK color space is a subtractive color mixing. Unlike the RGB color space, all colors are subtracted to get white. Cyan, magenta, yellow and black are the primary colors of the subtractive color mixing. A printing plate is created for each of these four colors. At the latest during the so-called RIP (Raster Image Processing) before the printing plates are exposed, all RGB images are converted to CMYK. This leads to a problem, because the RGB color space includes a larger number of displayable colors than the CMYK color space. If images are not created in CMYK, color shifts and color distortions may occur.

CMYK and RGB

What does “4|0-color” actually mean?

For some products you can choose the color. This often means 4|0-color or 4|1-color. These symbols have their exact meanings:

4|4-color: Front and back are printed in four colors.

4|1-color: Front is printed in four colors, back is printed in one color only.

4|0-color: The front is printed in four colors, the back remains unprinted.

1|1-color: Front and back are printed in one color.

1|0-color: The front is printed in one color, the back remains unprinted.

5|5-color: The front and back are printed in five colors.

6|6-color: Front and back are printed in six colors.

2|0-color: The front is printed in two colors, the back remains unprinted.

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